Nov
15
2021

Top 10 Reductions of the Word "Have"

Get ready to learn the nitty gritty details about English rhythm and word reductions, and sound more like a native speaker! This video will teach you the advanced pronunciations of the top 10 most common phrases in American English that use the word "have": could have, should have, would have, might have, must have, couldn't have, shouldn't have, wouldn't have, mustn't have, might not have.

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Oct
25
2021

Speak Clear and Fast English: Consonant to Consonant Linking

How does English sound so smooth? It's because of the linking, or the way that words and syllables are connected with each other. In this video, you'll learn about the most challenging form of linking - consonant to consonant linking - and you'll practice linking in the following words and phrases: aggressive vampires; have to; does she; What's your address?; Is soup ok?; with lemon; I can go.; tenth; Yes, you are!; Would you help me?

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Sep
27
2021

Difficult Reductions in English

Learn how to speak clear and fast English in this short video! Julie teaches you how to pronounce the common English reductions of the phrases: ask her, ask him, I asked her, I asked him.

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Sep
20
2021

How to Pronounce Difficult Words in American English [Part 22!]

Perfect your American English and learn to pronounce challenging English words in this video - and all pronunciations are shown up close and in slow motion. Plus, learn about linking with the Stop T and Flap T, and learn how the word "have" changes when it's in the phrase "have to"!

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Sep
13
2021

How to Pronounce Difficult Minimal Pairs - EH /ɛ/ vs. AA /æ/

In this video, Julie shows you how to pronounce two of the most challenging vowels in American English: the EH /ɛ/ "red" and the AA /æ/ "rad" vowels. Perfect your English pronunciation as you practice these minimal pairs: End/And (stressed), Beck/Back, Ken/Can, Bed/Bad, Beg/Bag/Bug, Ed/Add, Ekt (not a real word)/Act, Esk (not a real word)/Ask.

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Sep
08
2021

How to Pronounce Difficult Minimal Pairs - Student Request [Part 21]

Practice the ER vowels /ɝ, ɚ/, linking with the flap /ɾ/, the nasal flap, vowel reductions, and much more in the following words: Words, what else, drawing, action, good afternoon, preventive, audit, operations, apparatus. You'll see me pronounce each word at my regular pace, at a slower pace, and then up close and in slow motion!

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Sep
06
2021

Speak Clear and Fast English: Rule of Three and "Asked"

Learn to speak clear and fast English using reductions and the Rule of Three! In this video, Julie teaches you how to reduce the word "asked" using the Rule of Three. Then you'll practice reductions, linking, and rhythm with Julie at the end.

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Sep
06
2021

How to Pronounce Difficult Minimal Pairs - Student Request [Part 20]

Nearly all of my accent clients ask for help with pronouncing the American R sound, and they've requested help with the words in this video. What about you? How well can you pronounce the R-colored vowels in these words? Appear, stairs, alarm, car. In this short video, see each word as I pronounce it at my normal pace, at a slower pace, and then up close and in slow motion!

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Sep
03
2021

How to Pronounce Difficult Minimal Pairs - Student Request [Part 19]

This list of words targets many important areas of pronunciation - the Dark L, the AR vowel + Stop T, the ER vowel, the final J sound, and the tricky "aw" spelling in the word "jaw"! Channel, partner, negotiations, challenge, jaw. In this short video, see each word as I pronounce it at my normal pace, at a slower pace, and then up close and in slow motion!

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Aug
30
2021

How to Pronounce Difficult Minimal Pairs - AH /ɑ/ vs. UH /ʌ/ [Part 18]

How well can you pronounce the AH /ɑ/ and UH /ʌ/ vowels in these word pairs? Mosh/mush, socks/sucks, bog/bug, pox/pucks, Ron/run. In this short video, see each word as I pronounce it at my normal pace, at a slower pace, and then up close and in slow motion!

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Aug
23
2021

How to Pronounce Difficult Minimal Pairs - AH /ɑ/ vs. UH /ʌ/ [Student Request Part 17]

How well can you pronounce the AH /ɑ/ and UH /ʌ/ vowels in these word pairs? Don/done, knot/nut, flocks/flux, talk/tuck, and pawn/pun. In this short video, see each word as I pronounce it at my normal pace, at a slower pace, and then up close and in slow motion!

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Aug
16
2021

How to Pronounce Difficult Words in American English - [Student Request Part 16]

More difficult words as requested by my private accent clients! How well can you pronounce these words in American English? Monetization, horizontally, Israel, and parallel. In this short video, see each word as I pronounce it at my normal pace, at a slower pace, and then up close and in slow motion!

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Aug
09
2021

How to Pronounce Difficult Words in American English - [Student Request Part 15]

Listen for vowel reductions, vowel syncope (when a syllable is deleted completely), and the Light L vs. the Dark L! Colloquial, residue, averaging, and Spanish. In this short video, see each word as I pronounce it at my normal pace, at a slower pace, and then up close and in slow motion!

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Aug
02
2021

Perfect your American English Rhythm: Pronoun Reductions

Have you ever heard this before? "Izzy busy?" Huh? What does "izzy" mean? "Izzy" = "Is he." This is another example of reductions in spoken English - and in this example, it's a pronoun reduction. "He" reduced to "ee". In this video, you'll learn how to perfect your American English rhythm with pronoun reductions! The pronouns him, her, them, his, and him often reduce, which means the initial consonant is often dropped in spoken English. Learn how to reduce pronouns in this video, and practice with me at the end!

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Jul
26
2021

How to Pronounce Difficult Words in American English - Minimal Pairs [Student Request Part 14]

Let's practice some minimal pairs in American English! Get tons of practice with these two front vowels: AA /æ/, like in "bad", and EH /ɛ/, like in "bed". Can you pronounce: pressure vs. pleasure; laughed vs. left; sand vs. send; bad vs. bed; and bland vs. blend? No frills, no lengthy explanations - just the pronunciation!

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Jul
19
2021

Linking with the Contraction "I'd"

Learn how to link two consonants together using the contraction "I'd". The final /d/ in "I'd" usually turns into an unreleased D consonant, which can be super challenging for non native speakers to pronounce. This video is jam-packed with examples shown close up and in slow motion, analysis of the final D consonant in a waveform, and practice sentences at the end!

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Jul
12
2021

How to Pronounce Difficult Words in American English - Advanced English [Student Request Part 13]

Get ready to expand your English vocabulary! Learn to pronounce: barbaric, weir, momentum, and parameter. No frills, no extra explanations, just the pronunciation!

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Jul
05
2021

How to Pronounce Difficult Words in American English - Advanced English [Student Request Part 12]

Get ready to expand your English vocabulary. Here are some very advanced words in American English! Learn to pronounce: nonchalant, ignominious, Worcestershire, truculent, and surfeit. No frills, no extra explanations, just the pronunciation!

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Jun
28
2021

How to Pronounce Difficult Words in American English [Student Request Part 11]

This video is from another student request, and it includes lots of "big" words in American English! If you want to expand your English vocabulary, watch this video! Can you pronounce these words in American English? Pettiness, camaraderie, interchangeable, plateau, and echelon. No frills, no boring instructions, just the pronunciation - at regular pace, slow pace, and up close and in slow motion. Speak like a native with this video!

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Jun
21
2021

How to Pronounce Difficult Words in American English [Student Request Part 10]

This is the next video in the "Difficult Words in American English" series, as requested by my accent clients. Can you pronounce these words in American English? Poorer (adjective), attributed (verb), and interesting (adjective - 3 pronunciations!) In this short video, you'll see each word pronounced up close and in slow motion. No frills, no lengthy explanations - just the pronunciation!

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Jun
16
2021

Linking with Nasal Consonants

Did you know that the N /n/ consonant, like in the word "ten", can sometimes become the NG /ŋ/ consonant in spoken English...which means "ten" is sometimes pronounced as "teng"? When does that happen...and why does that happen?? Well, this video will show you! Learn how to smooth out your conversational English and connect words together using the nasal consonants M /m/, N /n/, and NG /ŋ/. And practice with me at the end!

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Jun
07
2021

How to Pronounce Difficult Words in American English - Dark L [Student Request Part 9]

This is the next video in the "Difficult Words in American English" series, as requested by my accent clients. Can you pronounce these words in American English? Model (noun, verb); bundle (noun, verb); curious (adjective); wildlife (noun). In this short video, you'll see each word pronounced up close and in slow motion. No frills, no lengthy explanations - just the pronunciation!

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May
31
2021

How to Pronounce Difficult Words in American English [Student Request Part 8]

This is the next video in the "Difficult Words in American English" series, as requested by my accent clients. Can you pronounce these words in American English? Theoretical (adjective); environmental (adjective); familiar (adjective, noun); and clothes (noun). In this short video, you'll see each word pronounced up close and in slow motion. No frills, no lengthy explanations - just the pronunciation!

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May
24
2021

Advanced Intonation: Statements and Questions

Intonation in American English can be challenging to master. Maybe you've learned that WH questions always have downward intonation at the end...but then you hear a native speaker use upward intonation with a WH question. Why did they do that? Didn't that violate the "intonation rule"? In this video, you'll learn both the basic and advanced intonation patterns for statements, Yes/No questions, and WH questions, and you'll have a chance to practice with me at the end!

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May
17
2021

How to Pronounce Difficult Words in American English [Student Request Part 7!]

How well can you pronounce these tricky words in American English? follow (verb), croissant (noun), outrageous (adjective), month vs. months (noun). No frills, no boring instructions, just the pronunciation - at regular pace, slow pace, and up close and in slow motion. Speak like a native with this video!

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May
10
2021

How to Pronounce Difficult Words in American English [Student Request Part 6!]

How well can you pronounce these tricky words in American English? pier (noun) co-coordinator (noun) vacation (noun, verb) girl (noun) No frills, no boring instructions, just the pronunciation - at regular pace, slow pace, and up close and in slow motion. Speak like a native with this video!

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May
03
2021

How to Pronounce Difficult Words in American English [Student Request Part 5!]

How well can you pronounce these tricky words in American English? Considered, Can vs. can’t ("Can't" has two pronunciations - one with a True T and one with a Stop T. The Stop T pronunciation is very common with native speakers!), Adulation, and Degenerative. No frills, no boring instructions, just the pronunciation - at regular pace, slow pace, and up close and in slow motion (with sound!) Speak like a native with this video!

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Apr
26
2021

How to Pronounce Difficult Words in American English [Student Request Part 4!]

Can you pronounce these words in American English? Deity (noun), Leisure (noun), Leave vs. Live (verb/adjective), and Collateral (noun/adjective) In this short video, you'll see each word pronounced up close and in slow motion. No frills, no lengthy explanations - just the pronunciation!

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Apr
19
2021

The Rule of Three

Have you ever wondered why native speakers of American English don't pronounce the "t" in "lastly"? Or in "Christmas"? Or in the phrase "first day"? It's because of the Rule of Three! The Rule of Three happens to other consonants as well, and it occurs both within words and across word boundaries when linking words together. Learn all about the Rule of Three in this video, and practice with me at the end!

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Apr
12
2021

How to Pronounce Difficult Words in American English: Student Request Part 3

Another student request! How well can you pronounce these words in American English? Conscience, ubiquitous, realm, and moderate (this word has 2 pronunciations: it's a noun/adjective and a verb). No frills, no boring instructions, just the pronunciation - at regular pace, slow pace, and up close and in slow motion (with sound!) Speak like a native with this video!

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Apr
05
2021

Linking with the B /b/ Consonant

If you want to master American English rhythm, you must perfect your linking skills! This video will discuss how to link words together using the B /b/ consonant, one of the stop consonants in American English. The B /b/ consonant, like other stop consonants, can be pronounced differently depending on where it occurs in the word and sentence, and depending on what sound comes after the B /b/ consonant. Sometimes the B /b/ consonant is unreleased (like in the phrase "cab driver"), and sometimes it actually moves to the next word and is released (like in "The cab is here")!

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Mar
29
2021

How to Pronounce 12 Difficult Words in American English [Another Student Request]

This video comes from another student request! How well can you pronounce these words in American English? Vulnerability, exposure, uncertainty, engineer, engineering, literal, literature, the Netherlands, maintenance, scenario, sixth, sixth day. No frills, no boring instructions, just the pronunciation - at regular pace, slow pace, and up close and in slow motion (with sound!) Speak like a native with this video!

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Mar
22
2021

American accent: How to pronounce 10 Difficult Words in American English [Student Request]

This video comes from a student request! Can you pronounce these 10 words in American English? Cumbersome, continuous, colonel, tired, taught, through, dropped, bud, suds, fifth (2 pronunciations). Hear the pronunciation at my regular speed, and then see each word up close and in slow motion (with sound!) so you can see the pronunciation in detail. No frills, no long explanations - just the actual pronunciation!

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Mar
15
2021

Linking with the P /p/ Consonant

This video will discuss how to link words together using the P /p/ consonant, one of the stop consonants in American English. The P /p/ consonant, like other stop consonants, can be pronounced differently depending on where it occurs in the word and sentence, and depending on what sound comes after the P /p/ consonant. Sometimes the P /p/ consonant is unreleased (like in "Top Gun"), and sometimes it actually moves to the next word and is released (like in "cup of coffee")! Perfect your American English linking skills in this video and practice with me at the end!

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Mar
08
2021

Linking with the K /k/ Consonant

The K /k/ consonant is a stop consonant, and even though it is called a "stop" consonant, it really should be called a "change" consonant - its pronunciation can change depending on where it occurs in the word. Sometimes it is released, sometimes it is unreleased, sometimes it is "mini-released", and sometimes it moves to the next word (!!!!!).

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Mar
01
2021

Master American English! Sentence Rhythm Part 2

American English rhythm comes from the syllable stress in a sentence. Stressed syllables are longer and unstressed syllables are shorter, and it's this back and forth between long syllables and short syllables that gives spoken English its unique rhythm. In this video, you'll perfect your American English rhythm with a fun clapping exercise - only the stressed syllables get the "beat"!

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Feb
22
2021

Learn the American Accent! Nasal Plosion and the Glottal Stop

If you look at the spelling of the words "eden" and "eaten", you would think their pronunciations would be completely different - but they're very similar! These words are "minimal pairs", which means they differ by one sound only. "Eden" has nasal plosion, and "eaten" has a glottal stop. But other than that, they sound the same! Learn the difference between nasal plosion and the glottal stop in words that are minimal pairs, and then perfect your American accent with word and sentence practice at the end of this video!

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Feb
15
2021

Linking with the G /g/ Consonant

What's the best way to improve the rhythm of your spoken English? Linking! Linking is how words (and syllables) connect to each other in spoken English. And once you know how to use linking effectively, your speech will sound smooth and rhythmic, with each word almost blending into the next. This video will show you how to link words together using the stop consonant G /g/, and you'll have a chance to practice with me at the end!

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Feb
11
2021

Your #1 Go-To Guide to the Dark L

If you have any questions about how to pronounce the Dark L in American English, THIS is your video! You'll learn how to pronounce the Dark L with drawings, videos, slow-motion shots, AND an ultrasound image of native speakers as they say the Dark L! Then you'll practice the Dark L in 9 different vowel + Dark L combinations. Watch this video - then watch it again - and learn how to pronounce the Dark L like a native speaker!

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Feb
01
2021

Vowel Length in American English

Long vowels, short vowels, medium vowels - in spoken English, does the length of the vowel really matter? Yes! There's a rule to vowel pronunciation that you won't find in a dictionary, but native speakers use it. And if you can master this pronunciation rule, both your vowels AND your consonants will improve! Learn how native speakers change the length of vowels in American English in this video - and then practice with me at the end!

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Jan
18
2021

3 Rules to Using Thought Groups in American English

In spoken English, your pronunciation is just as important as your rhythm! An important part of rhythm is thought groups - the way you pause between groups of words and use intonation to add meaning to your message. This video will teach you 3 rules to using thought groups - when to pause, when NOT to pause, and how to chunk your words together so they sound natural!

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Jan
11
2021

Nasal Plosion and a Final T Consonant

This video is for all the advanced English speakers out there!! Let's combine two important (and tricky) pronunciation areas of American English: The T consonant and nasal plosion!

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Jan
04
2021

The Nasal Flap in American English

You've heard about the flap, which is in words like "water", "letter", and "video". But that's not the only flap used in American English! Now you need to learn about the nasal flap /ɾ̃/, also known as the Vanishing T, which native speakers use in words like "internet", "twenty", and "wanted".

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Dec
28
2020

The Glottal Stop in American English

Glottal Stop. Stop T. Glottal T. All three terms refer to the same sound, and this sound is very common in American English. In this video, you'll learn 4 ways to use the glottal stop in American English! Master the American accent and learn how to use the glottal stop in words like "certain", "oven", and "can't", and when linking words together, like in "let me"!

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Dec
21
2020

All About the Flap (aka Flap T)

What's the easiest way to sound more like a native speaker of American English? Use the flap! The flap occurs everywhere in American English, and if you want to sound natural to a native speaker, you must learn how to pronounce it and when to use it! Learn all about the flap in this video, both within words and when linking between words!

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Dec
14
2020

How to Pronounce Words with Nasal Plosion

Nasal plosion is an advanced area of American English pronunciation, but if you can use it correctly, you will sound much more natural to a native speaker! Nasal plosion can occur in words that have a final unstressed D + N combination, like in the words "sudden", "widen", and "hidden". The D changes to an unreleased D, the vowel in that syllable is dropped, and the N changes into a syllabic consonant. This sounds confusing, but I promise, it will make sense once you practice with this video!

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Dec
07
2020

How the Dark L Influences Vowels

The Dark L is a tricky sound! It is difficult to pronounce on its own, but it's even more difficult when it is in a word like "feel" or "pill" or "sale". Why? Because it influences the way the vowel is pronounced - the vowel changes because of the Dark L! In this video, you'll learn how the Dark L can influence the way a vowel is pronounced in words that contain a vowel + Dark L combination!

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Nov
30
2020

Linking with the Unreleased D

If you want to speak like a native speaker of American English, you have to master linking! Linking is how native speakers connect words together in spoken English, and there are lots of ways to do it! This video will teach you how to link words together using the D consonant, like in the sentence, "I had to." Something funny happens to the D sound - it becomes unreleased! Watch to learn more!

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Nov
16
2020

How to Pronounce Usual and Usually

"Usual" and "usually" are great examples of how vowel syncope and syllable reductions can impact pronunciation! You might be surprised to learn that there are TWO ways to pronounce "usual", and THREE ways to pronounce "usually" - watch the video to learn which pronunciations are the most common, and see all pronunciations up close and in slow motion!

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Nov
02
2020

How to Link Words Using the Stop T

A funny thing happens to the True T sound when it comes at the end of a word. Sometimes it turns into a completely different sound - a Stop T sound. Native speakers may use a Stop T within a word, like in the word "written", or between words to link them together, like in the phrase "Put that down". Improve the rhythm of your spoken English and learn the rules for using a Stop T sound to link words together in this video!

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Oct
26
2020

How to Pronounce Or, War, East, and Yeast

"Or/war" and "east/yeast" sound so similar - and they look similar when someone pronounces them. How can you tell the difference within these word pairs? There is one key difference between these words, and it happens so quickly in conversational speech that you might miss it. Perfect your American accent AND your listening skills with this video!

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Oct
19
2020

How to Pronounce Been, Bean, and Being

Been, bean, and being sound so similar, and they look similar when someone pronounces them! But there are 4 ways in which these words are different: length, intonation, syllable count, and the vowel and consonant sounds. Perfect your American accent and learn the tricks to pronouncing been, bean, and being like a native speaker!

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Oct
12
2020

Speak Fast English: How to Shorten Your Words

If you want to instantly improve the rhythm of your spoken English, this is the way to do it! Speak like a native by using these four tips to make your words shorter in American English: contractions, reductions, contractions + reductions, and "informal contractions"!

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Oct
05
2020

Vowel Syncope: Words You're Saying Wrong!

American English loves to meddle with the vowels! Vowels can be reduced, they can have multiple pronunciations, and they can be combined with other sounds. In the case of vowel syncope, the vowels are deleted completely! (Poor vowels!) Learn the most common pronunciations of "chocolate", "favorite", "interested", "difference", and "separate" - all of which contain vowel syncope in their pronunciations.

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Sep
28
2020

How to Pronounce Syllabic Consonants

Have you been told this before: "If you count the number of vowels in a word in American English, then you'll know the number of syllables in that word"? That's not entirely true! Sometimes syllables have no vowels - only consonants! The N, M, L, and R consonants can become syllabic consonants, which means they take the place of the vowel in that syllable. Learn how to pronounce these syllabic consonants in this video!

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Sep
20
2020

How Nasal Consonants Influence Vowels

American English doesn't have nasal vowels...BUT...nasal consonants can influence the way vowels are pronounced! If you want to sound natural to a native speaker, you need to master the nasalization of the American English vowels. Practice your nasalized vowels in this video!

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Sep
16
2020

IPA Listening Quiz: Vowels

How well do you know the American English vowels? And how well do you know the IPA symbols that correspond to the American English vowels? Test your knowledge with this video! You'll complete 6 listening quizzes that test the monophthongs, diphthongs, and R-colored vowels of American English!

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Sep
06
2020

Word Reductions of Conjunctions

How do native speakers talk so fast? Here's the trick: word reductions! Native speakers will actually change the vowel in a word into a vowel that is easier to say, and this helps the word to be said faster! Word reductions happen often in American English - master these, and you'll sound more like a native speaker! Learn how to reduce the conjunctions "and", "or", "so", and "but" in this video!

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Aug
30
2020

Ten Difficult Words in American English Part 2

American English pronunciation can be tricky - there are silent letters, hidden sounds, and multiple pronunciations for the same spelling. Even native speakers have difficulty pronouncing certain words! Watch this video to perfect your pronunciation of 10 difficult words in American English, with examples that are up close and in slow motion! The words included in this video are: tour, tourist, rural, mural, squirrel, pencil, awful, felt, aspirin, average

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Aug
26
2020

How to Pronounce the OOR /ʊɹ/ Vowel

The American English OOR /ʊɹ/ vowel is a lesser-known R-colored vowel. It's in the words "tour", "lure", and sometimes in the word "you're". This vowel is different than the other R-colored vowels because not all native speakers use this vowel - sometimes they use the OR /ɔɹ/ or ER /ɝ/ vowels instead! Watch to learn some pronunciation tips about this R-colored vowel, close up and in slow motion!

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Aug
25
2020

How to Pronounce the OR /ɔɹ/ Vowel

Perfect your American accent and learn how to pronounce the American English OR /ɔɹ/ vowel! The OR vowel is in the words "door", "order", and "your". The trick to making this vowel is to keep your lips rounded!

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Aug
11
2020

How to Pronounce the AR /ɑɹ/ Vowel

What sound does a pirate make? "ARRRRRR!" If you've ever wondered how to make the "pirate sound", this video is for you! Learn the American English AR /ɑɹ/ vowel, like in the words "car", "heart", and "party", in both stressed and unstressed syllables!

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Aug
10
2020

How to Pronounce the AIR /ɛɹ/ Vowel

The American English AIR /ɛɹ/ vowel is in the words "hair", "dare", and "bear", and it's a great example of how American English spelling does NOT match the pronunciation! Perfect your American accent and learn how to pronounce this tricky R-colored vowel, in both stressed and unstressed syllables!

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Aug
03
2020

How to Stop Overusing "Filler Words"

How often does this happen to you? You're talking to a group of people, and then...THIS comes out of your mouth: "Um...hmmm..well, like yeah..." The dreaded filler words! But don't worry - you CAN learn how to stop overusing filler words in your speech! Watch the video to learn 4 easy tips that will help you to stop using filler words and help make your speech more fluent and effective!

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Jul
29
2020

How to Pronounce the EAR Vowel

The R sound is a distinguishing feature of American English, and if you want to sound more like a native speaker, you need to master the R-colored vowels! Learn how to pronounce the EAR /ɪɹ/ vowel, like in the words "here", "year", and "appear", in stressed and unstressed syllables - close up and in slow motion!

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Jul
28
2020

How to Pronounce the ER Vowel /ɝ, ɚ/

Learn how to pronounce the American English R-colored vowel ER /ɝ,ɚ/, like in the words "bird" and "mother". American English loves the R sound in all forms, so if you want to sound like a native speaker, you need to master the R-colored vowels! There are two different IPA symbols for this vowel, depending on if it is stressed or unstressed. Learn how to pronounce both the stressed and unstressed vowels in this video!

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Jul
27
2020

An Introduction to R-Colored Vowels

Did you know the American R sound can be both a consonant and a vowel? It's a bit confusing, but this video will teach you the basics of the Consonant R /ɹ/ versus the Vowel R. If you want to sound more like a native American English speaker, you need to master the R-colored vowels!

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Jul
16
2020

The Three Types of Syllable Stress

American English is a stress-timed language: some syllables are longer, and some syllables are shorter. But there's more to it than just "stressed" and "unstressed" - there's a third type of stress that occurs in some words that are three or more syllables. Improve your English pronunciation and master the three types of syllable stress in American English!

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Jul
08
2020

How to Pronounce the UH /ʊ/ Vowel

The UH /ʊ/ Vowel is in the words "book", "put", and "could", and if you ask me, this is the WEIRDEST vowel in American English! Learn tips on how to pronounce the UH /ʊ/ vowel in stressed and unstressed positions, up close and in slow-motion!

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Jun
29
2020

How to Pronounce the OO /u/ Vowel

The OO /u/ vowel, like in the word "too", is fairly common in other languages, so you might have it in your native language. But there are a couple of things that make the OO /u/ vowel different in American English! Learn what makes this vowel uniquely American in this video - up close and in slow-motion!

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Jun
23
2020

American English Voice Placement

If you've been struggling with your American accent, it could be because of your voice placement. This video will teach you the theory behind voice placement and some effective exercises you can do to achieve an American voice placement!

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Jun
18
2020

How to Pronounce the EE /i/ Vowel

Learn how native American English speakers pronounce the EE /i/, like in "see" vowel, in both stressed and unstressed syllables! And sound more like a native speaker with vowel gliding!

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Jun
18
2020

How to Pronounce the IH /I/ Vowel

Perfect your American accent and learn the tricks to pronouncing this unique American English vowel, IH /ɪ/, like in the words "bit", "live", and "window". You'll see this vowel up close and in slow motion, in both stressed and unstressed syllables. And learn tips on how this vowel changes when it comes before the NG consonant, like in the word "sing"!

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Jun
10
2020

How to Pronounce the AH /ɑ/ Vowel

Improve your American Accent! Learn how to pronounce the American English vowel AH /ɑ/, like in "father" - and learn how this vowel has replaced the AW /ɔ/ vowel!

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Jun
05
2020

Learn the American accent with The Office!

This is an in-depth analysis of a scripted conversation from the American TV show The Office. I'll analyze all areas of American English - pronunciation of vowels, consonants, syllable and word stress, intonation, and vocabulary. Take notes - this is a great way to learn!

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Jun
02
2020

How to Pronounce the Schwa UH /ə/ Vowel

Improve your American accent and learn how to pronounce the most common vowel in American English: the schwa! It's so important that it has its own name! The schwa UH /ə/ vowel is in the words about, computer, and banana.

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Jun
02
2020

How to Pronounce the UH /ʌ/ Vowel

Improve your American accent and learn how to pronounce the UH /ʌ / like in "butter" vowel! See the vowel up close and in slow motion, in both stressed and unstressed syllables!

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Jun
01
2020

Introduction to the Schwa UH /ə/ Vowel

Perfect your American accent and learn all about the American schwa UH /ə/ vowel, like in the word "about". You'll learn why the schwa is the most common vowel in American English, and when to use it in word reductions!

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May
25
2020

How to Pronounce the EH /ɛ/ Vowel

Improve your American accent and learn how to pronounce the American English vowel EH /ɛ/, like in the word "red"! See the EH vowel up close and in slow motion, in both stressed and unstressed syllables!

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May
25
2020

How to Pronounce the AA /æ/ Vowel

Learn how to pronounce the American English vowel AA /æ/, like in the word "bat" - including how this vowel changes when it is next to an N, M, or NG consonant!

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May
14
2020

How to Pronounce the OY /ɔɪ/ Diphthong

Learn the American accent! The OY /ɔɪ/, like in "boy", vowel is called a diphthong - this means it has TWO sounds! Learn the correct lip, jaw, and tongue placement as you say this American English diphthong vowel, in both stressed and unstressed words!

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May
04
2020

How to Pronounce the AI /aɪ/ Diphthong

The AI /aɪ/ like in "time" American English diphthong has TWO vowel sounds. Learn the correct jaw, lip, and tongue positions as you glide from the first position to the last, in both stressed and unstressed words!

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Apr
26
2020

How to Pronounce the AY /eɪ/ Diphthong

The American English AY in "day" vowel is called a diphthong, which means it has TWO sounds! Learn the correct tongue, lip, and jaw positions as you say this common vowel of American English!

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Apr
20
2020

How to Pronounce the OW /aʊ/ Diphthong

The OW /aʊ/ in "how" is called a diphthong, and it has TWO sounds. Learn tips on how to correctly move your lips, jaw, and tongue to say the OW sound! Tip: Make sure you feel movement in your lips, jaw, and tongue as you say OW - and there is a lot of movement with this sound!

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Apr
14
2020

How to Pronounce the OH /oʊ/ Diphthong

The OH /oʊ/ in "no" American English diphthong has TWO vowel sounds. Learn the correct jaw, lip, and tongue positions as you glide from the first position to the last, in both stressed and unstressed words!

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Apr
08
2020

The Basics of Voice Production Part 6: Articulatory Exercises

This video is the final installment of the Basics of Voice Production Series. Learn to speak with precision as you practice these challenging tongue twisters!

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Apr
07
2020

The Basics of Voice Production Part 5: Phonatory Exercises

This video is part 5 of the Basics of Voice Production series. A clear and strong voice is powered by vocal cords that vibrate easily and efficiently. Learn some quick exercises to improve your vocal cord vibration - no equipment required!

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Apr
06
2020

The Basics of Voice Production Part 4: Resonatory Exercises

This video is part 4 of the Basics of Voice Production series. The Resonatory System is the reason why YOU sound like YOU. Learn how to maximize the resonance in your voice so that your voice sounds more rich, full, warm, and pleasant, with minimal effort!

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Apr
02
2020

Sentence Analysis: Parks and Recreation Part 1

Test your English pronunciation skills with sentence analysis! This video discusses all areas of English pronunciation - vowels, consonants, syllable stress, word linking, word reductions, and vocabulary - using a scene from Parks and Recreation!

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Mar
29
2020

AH /ɑ/ and UH /ʌ/ Vowels: Minimal Pairs Listening Quiz

How well can you hear the difference between the words "cot" and "cut"? Improve your listening and speaking skills of the AH /ɑ/ in "father" and the UH /ʌ/ in "butter" vowels with this minimal pairs listening quiz!

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Mar
27
2020

EE and IH Vowels: Minimal Pairs Listening Quiz

How well can you hear the difference between the words bead and bid? Perfect your listening and pronunciation of the EE /i/ and IH /ɪ/ vowels in American English with this listening quiz!

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Mar
26
2020

The Basics of Voice Production Part 3: Respiration Exercises

This video is Part 3 of the Basics of Voice Production Series. The breath is the power source of the voice - learn exercises to increase your breath support and control your respiration for strong, consistent voicing!

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Mar
25
2020

The Basics of Voice Production Part 2: Vocal Warm-Ups

This is Part 2 of the Basics of Voice Production series. All muscles need to be warmed up before they are used, and the voice is no exception! Learn some quick and effective exercises to warm-up the voice so you can speak with clarity and precision!

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Mar
22
2020

How to Pronounce 10 Difficult Words in English: Part 1

Learn the best tips on how to pronounce 10 difficult words in English (that you may be pronouncing wrong!), including milk, girl, world, million, clothes, months, vegetables, comfortable, three, and thirty.

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Mar
16
2020

How to Pronounce the N /n/ and NG /ŋ/ Consonants

Learn the tips to pronouncing the N /n/ in "sun" and NG /ŋ/ in "song" - and learn when you can reduce the NG sound!

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Mar
10
2020

Basics of Voice Production Part 1: Voicing Subsystems

Where do our voices come from? And how do they work? If you want to become a better English speaker, you need to learn the fundamentals about how you make your voice! In this video, you'll learn about the body systems involved in voicing and speech production!

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Mar
02
2020

How to Pronounce the TH Sound

Here are the BEST tips to pronouncing the American TH sound - including the variations of the TH sound!

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Feb
23
2020

How to Pronounce the Light L and Dark L Sounds

How is the L in "love" different from the L in "tall"? Learn about the light L and dark L sounds in this video!

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Feb
16
2020

Rhythm in Sentences

Perfect the rhythm of your spoken English with this easy musical activity!

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Feb
04
2020

The Best Way to Practice Your American English Pronunciation

Learn the most effective tips at improving your American English pronunciation!

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Feb
04
2020

The Vowels of American English

What makes the vowel in "beat" different from the bowel in "bit"? Learn about the front, central, and back vowels of American English!

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Feb
04
2020

Place, Manner, and Voicing of the American English Consonants

How is the "P" sound different from the "B" sound? Learn what makes the American English consonants different from each other!

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Feb
04
2020

Stress in Sentences

Where does the rhythm come from when Americans speak? Learn about stress in sentences!

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Feb
04
2020

AH and UH Vowels: A Visual Test

How well can you pronounce the AH (father) and the UH (butter) vowels in American English? Test your pronunciation skills with this visual test!

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Feb
04
2020

EE and IH Vowels: A Visual Test

How good is your pronunciation of the EE (beat) and IH (bit) vowels in American English? Test your skills with this visual test!

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Feb
04
2020

The American R Sound as a Consonant and a Vowel

How is the R in "right" different from the R in "learn"? Test your knowledge of the American R sound with this video!

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Feb
04
2020

The American T in Sentences

The American T sound can be pronounced three different ways! Test your knowledge about the three American T sounds with this video.

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Feb
04
2020

Word Reductions: Function Words

Where does American English get its rhythm and flow? Learn how to reduce the function words in American English in this video!

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Feb
04
2020

Vowel to Vowel Linking in American English

Improve the flow of your spoken English through linking words together!

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Feb
04
2020

Best Resources in Accent Reduction

Learn about the best resources to help you improve your English pronunciation!

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Jan
15
2020

Linking In Connected Speech

Spoken English sounds like one, long connected word.

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Jan
15
2020

Unstressed Syllables and Word Reductions in American English

Learn about unstressed syllables and word reductions in American English with these examples using commonly used words!

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Jan
08
2020

Syllables and Stress of American English

Learn about two important parts of American English pronunciation - syllables and stress - in this quick video and blog!

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Nov
20
2019

How to Pronounce the AH /ɑ/ Vowel and the UH /ʌ/ Vowel

Pronouncing the "ah" and "uh" vowels can be difficult for non-native English speakers to pronounce, so I created this video to help!

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Oct
16
2019

How to Pronounce the L Sound: Light L vs. Dark L

The L sound is tricky for many people - learn more about how to pronounce the light L and dark L sounds in this quick video and article!

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Sep
21
2019

I'm a Native American English speaker...With an Accent

There are many, many regional accents throughout the United States. And even within the same region, there are even more specific differences in pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar.

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Aug
31
2019

5 Tips to Ease Presentation Anxiety

It happens to the best of us.

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Aug
19
2019

Six Vocal Warm-ups Everyone Should Be Doing

Most of us can agree on the importance of warming up our bodies before we start exercising. Without a proper warm-up, our muscles may be stiff and be more susceptible to injury.

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Aug
06
2019

What Can a Corporate Speech Trainer Do For You?

How many times during any given day would you guess that you communicate with other people?

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Jul
22
2019

How to Improve Your Spoken American English

Many of my clients ask me how they can sound more like a native speaker. Even if you know how to pronounce all of the vowels and consonants of English, you may not sound as natural as a native speaker when you’re talking in a conversation.

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Jul
17
2019

What's Voice Got To Do With It?

Consider this scenario: You have to give a speech at your daughter’s wedding. You prepared your speech weeks ago...

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Jul
13
2019

Where Do American Accents Come From?

We know that accents are everywhere. We all have one, and depending on where someone has lived and how old they were when they lived there, we may have a combination of many accents in our speaking pattern.

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Jul
03
2019

Let's Learn the IPA! American English Vowels

My video and article explaining the IPA symbols for American English Vowels to help you improve your pronunciation.

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Jun
20
2019

The Top 5 Problematic Sounds in American English: The AY /eɪ/ "bait" and EH /ɛ/ "bet" vowels

Learn the tricks to pronouncing the American English tense/lax vowel pair AY /eɪ/ (bait) and EH /ɛ/ (bet)!

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Jun
18
2019

Let's Learn the IPA! American English Consonants

My video and article explaining the IPA for American English consonants along with some handy graphs to help you learn.

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Jun
09
2019

The Top 5 Problematic Sounds in American English: The “eee” and “ih” vowels

This is Part Four of the Top 5 Problematic Sounds in American English.

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Jun
03
2019

The Top 5 Problematic Sounds in American English: The "r" Sound

This is Part Three of the Top 5 Problematic Sounds in American English.

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May
25
2019

The Top 5 Problematic Sounds in American English: The TH Sound

This is Part Two of the Top 5 Problematic Sounds in American English. Based on my experience with accent modification, most people have difficulties with these same 5 sounds, regardless of their native language. So let’s continue with the next sound: The TH sound.

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May
11
2019

The Top 5 Problematic Sounds in American English: The "t" Sound

Based on my experience with accent modification, most people have difficulties with these same 5 sounds, regardless of their native language. I’ll begin this series with the first sound, “t”.

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May
08
2019

Exciting news! I've been featured in a newly published book!

I’ve been featured in the book Here's How to Do Accent Modification: A Manual for Speech-Language Pathologists , written by my colleague Robert McKinney!

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May
01
2019

American Accent Basics: What is an accent? Why do I have one? How do I reduce my accent to sound like a native American English speaker?

Let's consider the definition of an accent to be: “A distinctive mode of pronunciation of a language, especially one associated with a particular nation, locality, or social class.” According to this definition, we all have an accent.

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