Free video lessons on the American English Consonants

 

In these videos, you'll master the American English consonants as Julie gives you detailed instructions on how to pronounce each sound like a native speaker. You'll complete practice exercises with Julie in each lesson as you perfect your consonant pronunciation!

 

Jun
07
2021

How to Pronounce Difficult Words in American English - Dark L [Student Request Part 9]

This is the next video in the "Difficult Words in American English" series, as requested by my accent clients. Can you pronounce these words in American English? Model (noun, verb); bundle (noun, verb); curious (adjective); wildlife (noun). In this short video, you'll see each word pronounced up close and in slow motion. No frills, no lengthy explanations - just the pronunciation!

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Feb
22
2021

Learn the American Accent! Nasal Plosion and the Glottal Stop

If you look at the spelling of the words "eden" and "eaten", you would think their pronunciations would be completely different - but they're very similar! These words are "minimal pairs", which means they differ by one sound only. "Eden" has nasal plosion, and "eaten" has a glottal stop. But other than that, they sound the same! Learn the difference between nasal plosion and the glottal stop in words that are minimal pairs, and then perfect your American accent with word and sentence practice at the end of this video!

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Feb
11
2021

Your #1 Go-To Guide to the Dark L

If you have any questions about how to pronounce the Dark L in American English, THIS is your video! You'll learn how to pronounce the Dark L with drawings, videos, slow-motion shots, AND an ultrasound image of native speakers as they say the Dark L! Then you'll practice the Dark L in 9 different vowel + Dark L combinations. Watch this video - then watch it again - and learn how to pronounce the Dark L like a native speaker!

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Jan
11
2021

Nasal Plosion and a Final T Consonant

This video is for all the advanced English speakers out there!! Let's combine two important (and tricky) pronunciation areas of American English: The T consonant and nasal plosion!

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Jan
04
2021

The Nasal Flap in American English

You've heard about the flap, which is in words like "water", "letter", and "video". But that's not the only flap used in American English! Now you need to learn about the nasal flap /ɾ̃/, also known as the Vanishing T, which native speakers use in words like "internet", "twenty", and "wanted".

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Dec
28
2020

The Glottal Stop in American English

Glottal Stop. Stop T. Glottal T. All three terms refer to the same sound, and this sound is very common in American English. In this video, you'll learn 4 ways to use the glottal stop in American English! Master the American accent and learn how to use the glottal stop in words like "certain", "oven", and "can't", and when linking words together, like in "let me"!

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Dec
21
2020

All About the Flap (aka Flap T)

What's the easiest way to sound more like a native speaker of American English? Use the flap! The flap occurs everywhere in American English, and if you want to sound natural to a native speaker, you must learn how to pronounce it and when to use it! Learn all about the flap in this video, both within words and when linking between words!

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Dec
14
2020

How to Pronounce Words with Nasal Plosion

Nasal plosion is an advanced area of American English pronunciation, but if you can use it correctly, you will sound much more natural to a native speaker! Nasal plosion can occur in words that have a final unstressed D + N combination, like in the words "sudden", "widen", and "hidden". The D changes to an unreleased D, the vowel in that syllable is dropped, and the N changes into a syllabic consonant. This sounds confusing, but I promise, it will make sense once you practice with this video!

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Dec
07
2020

How the Dark L Influences Vowels

The Dark L is a tricky sound! It is difficult to pronounce on its own, but it's even more difficult when it is in a word like "feel" or "pill" or "sale". Why? Because it influences the way the vowel is pronounced - the vowel changes because of the Dark L! In this video, you'll learn how the Dark L can influence the way a vowel is pronounced in words that contain a vowel + Dark L combination!

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Nov
30
2020

Linking with the Unreleased D

If you want to speak like a native speaker of American English, you have to master linking! Linking is how native speakers connect words together in spoken English, and there are lots of ways to do it! This video will teach you how to link words together using the D consonant, like in the sentence, "I had to." Something funny happens to the D sound - it becomes unreleased! Watch to learn more!

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Nov
02
2020

How to Link Words Using the Stop T

A funny thing happens to the True T sound when it comes at the end of a word. Sometimes it turns into a completely different sound - a Stop T sound. Native speakers may use a Stop T within a word, like in the word "written", or between words to link them together, like in the phrase "Put that down". Improve the rhythm of your spoken English and learn the rules for using a Stop T sound to link words together in this video!

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Sep
28
2020

How to Pronounce Syllabic Consonants

Have you been told this before: "If you count the number of vowels in a word in American English, then you'll know the number of syllables in that word"? That's not entirely true! Sometimes syllables have no vowels - only consonants! The N, M, L, and R consonants can become syllabic consonants, which means they take the place of the vowel in that syllable. Learn how to pronounce these syllabic consonants in this video!

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Sep
20
2020

How Nasal Consonants Influence Vowels

American English doesn't have nasal vowels...BUT...nasal consonants can influence the way vowels are pronounced! If you want to sound natural to a native speaker, you need to master the nasalization of the American English vowels. Practice your nasalized vowels in this video!

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Mar
16
2020

How to Pronounce the N /n/ and NG /ŋ/ Consonants

Learn the tips to pronouncing the N /n/ in "sun" and NG /ŋ/ in "song" - and learn when you can reduce the NG sound!

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Mar
02
2020

How to Pronounce the TH Sound

Here are the BEST tips to pronouncing the American TH sound - including the variations of the TH sound!

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Feb
23
2020

How to Pronounce the Light L and Dark L Sounds

How is the L in "love" different from the L in "tall"? Learn about the light L and dark L sounds in this video!

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Feb
04
2020

Place, Manner, and Voicing of the American English Consonants

How is the "P" sound different from the "B" sound? Learn what makes the American English consonants different from each other!

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Feb
04
2020

The American R Sound as a Consonant and a Vowel

How is the R in "right" different from the R in "learn"? Test your knowledge of the American R sound with this video!

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Feb
04
2020

The American T in Sentences

The American T sound can be pronounced three different ways! Test your knowledge about the three American T sounds with this video.

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Oct
16
2019

How to Pronounce the L Sound: Light L vs. Dark L

The L sound is tricky for many people - learn more about how to pronounce the light L and dark L sounds in this quick video and article!

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Jun
03
2019

The Top 5 Problematic Sounds in American English: The "r" Sound

This is Part Three of the Top 5 Problematic Sounds in American English.

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May
25
2019

The Top 5 Problematic Sounds in American English: The TH Sound

This is Part Two of the Top 5 Problematic Sounds in American English. Based on my experience with accent modification, most people have difficulties with these same 5 sounds, regardless of their native language. So let’s continue with the next sound: The TH sound.

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May
11
2019

The Top 5 Problematic Sounds in American English: The "t" Sound

Based on my experience with accent modification, most people have difficulties with these same 5 sounds, regardless of their native language. I’ll begin this series with the first sound, “t”.

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