Free video lessons on American English rhythm and reductions!

 

Master the rhythm, speed, and fluency of a native English speaker with these free videos! Julie teaches you how to speak fast English with innovative and unique practice techniques that will transform your English skills!

 

Mar
18
2022

Speak FAST English with my #1 FREE Practice Tool!

In this video, Julie shows you her #1 best practice tool that can help you master American English rhythm, speed, and fluency - and the best part is it's FREE! Practice with Julie and master the American accent and English pronunciation in this video!

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Nov
15
2021

Top 10 Reductions of the Word "Have"

Get ready to learn the nitty gritty details about English rhythm and word reductions, and sound more like a native speaker! This video will teach you the advanced pronunciations of the top 10 most common phrases in American English that use the word "have": could have, should have, would have, might have, must have, couldn't have, shouldn't have, wouldn't have, mustn't have, might not have.

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Sep
27
2021

Difficult Reductions in English

Learn how to speak clear and fast English in this short video! Julie teaches you how to pronounce the common English reductions of the phrases: ask her, ask him, I asked her, I asked him.

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Sep
06
2021

Speak Clear and Fast English: Rule of Three and "Asked"

Learn to speak clear and fast English using reductions and the Rule of Three! In this video, Julie teaches you how to reduce the word "asked" using the Rule of Three. Then you'll practice reductions, linking, and rhythm with Julie at the end.

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Aug
02
2021

Perfect your American English Rhythm: Pronoun Reductions

Have you ever heard this before? "Izzy busy?" Huh? What does "izzy" mean? "Izzy" = "Is he." This is another example of reductions in spoken English - and in this example, it's a pronoun reduction. "He" reduced to "ee". In this video, you'll learn how to perfect your American English rhythm with pronoun reductions! The pronouns him, her, them, his, and him often reduce, which means the initial consonant is often dropped in spoken English. Learn how to reduce pronouns in this video, and practice with me at the end!

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Jul
19
2021

Linking with the Contraction "I'd"

Learn how to link two consonants together using the contraction "I'd". The final /d/ in "I'd" usually turns into an unreleased D consonant, which can be super challenging for non native speakers to pronounce. This video is jam-packed with examples shown close up and in slow motion, analysis of the final D consonant in a waveform, and practice sentences at the end!

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Apr
19
2021

The Rule of Three

Have you ever wondered why native speakers of American English don't pronounce the "t" in "lastly"? Or in "Christmas"? Or in the phrase "first day"? It's because of the Rule of Three! The Rule of Three happens to other consonants as well, and it occurs both within words and across word boundaries when linking words together. Learn all about the Rule of Three in this video, and practice with me at the end!

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Mar
01
2021

Master American English! Sentence Rhythm Part 2

American English rhythm comes from the syllable stress in a sentence. Stressed syllables are longer and unstressed syllables are shorter, and it's this back and forth between long syllables and short syllables that gives spoken English its unique rhythm. In this video, you'll perfect your American English rhythm with a fun clapping exercise - only the stressed syllables get the "beat"!

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Oct
12
2020

Speak Fast English: How to Shorten Your Words

If you want to instantly improve the rhythm of your spoken English, this is the way to do it! Speak like a native by using these four tips to make your words shorter in American English: contractions, reductions, contractions + reductions, and "informal contractions"!

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Oct
05
2020

Vowel Syncope: Words You're Saying Wrong!

American English loves to meddle with the vowels! Vowels can be reduced, they can have multiple pronunciations, and they can be combined with other sounds. In the case of vowel syncope, the vowels are deleted completely! (Poor vowels!) Learn the most common pronunciations of "chocolate", "favorite", "interested", "difference", and "separate" - all of which contain vowel syncope in their pronunciations.

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Sep
28
2020

How to Pronounce Syllabic Consonants

Have you been told this before: "If you count the number of vowels in a word in American English, then you'll know the number of syllables in that word"? That's not entirely true! Sometimes syllables have no vowels - only consonants! The N, M, L, and R consonants can become syllabic consonants, which means they take the place of the vowel in that syllable. Learn how to pronounce these syllabic consonants in this video!

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Sep
06
2020

Word Reductions of Conjunctions

How do native speakers talk so fast? Here's the trick: word reductions! Native speakers will actually change the vowel in a word into a vowel that is easier to say, and this helps the word to be said faster! Word reductions happen often in American English - master these, and you'll sound more like a native speaker! Learn how to reduce the conjunctions "and", "or", "so", and "but" in this video!

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Feb
16
2020

Rhythm in Sentences

Perfect the rhythm of your spoken English with this easy musical activity!

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Feb
04
2020

Word Reductions: Function Words

Where does American English get its rhythm and flow? Learn how to reduce the function words in American English in this video!

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Jan
15
2020

Unstressed Syllables and Word Reductions in American English

Learn about unstressed syllables and word reductions in American English with these examples using commonly used words!

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