Speak with smooth and fluent English with free videos on linking!

 

How do native speakers sound so smooth when they speak? It's because of linking! In these lessons, Julie will teach you how to smooth out your speech by linking syllables and words together, just like a native speaker! All lessons come with practice exercises to help you master the skill of linking.

 

Jun
03
2022

Linking: Assimilation of S, TS, and Y /j/

You know how you learned the S /s/ consonant makes the "s" sound? Well, forget about that! Sometimes native speakers break this pronunciation rule, and you can, too! In this video, you'll learn what happens to the S consonant and the TS ending when they link up with the Y /j/ consonant, like in the phrases, "bless you" and "what's your." Here's a hint: In both of these phrases, an entirely new sound is created!

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Oct
25
2021

Speak Clear and Fast English: Consonant to Consonant Linking

How does English sound so smooth? It's because of the linking, or the way that words and syllables are connected with each other. In this video, you'll learn about the most challenging form of linking - consonant to consonant linking - and you'll practice linking in the following words and phrases: aggressive vampires; have to; does she; What's your address?; Is soup ok?; with lemon; I can go.; tenth; Yes, you are!; Would you help me?

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Sep
27
2021

Difficult Reductions in English

Learn how to speak clear and fast English in this short video! Julie teaches you how to pronounce the common English reductions of the phrases: ask her, ask him, I asked her, I asked him.

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Sep
06
2021

Speak Clear and Fast English: Rule of Three and "Asked"

Learn to speak clear and fast English using reductions and the Rule of Three! In this video, Julie teaches you how to reduce the word "asked" using the Rule of Three. Then you'll practice reductions, linking, and rhythm with Julie at the end.

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Jul
19
2021

Linking with the Contraction "I'd"

Learn how to link two consonants together using the contraction "I'd". The final /d/ in "I'd" usually turns into an unreleased D consonant, which can be super challenging for non native speakers to pronounce. This video is jam-packed with examples shown close up and in slow motion, analysis of the final D consonant in a waveform, and practice sentences at the end!

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Jun
16
2021

Linking with Nasal Consonants

Did you know that the N /n/ consonant, like in the word "ten", can sometimes become the NG /ŋ/ consonant in spoken English...which means "ten" is sometimes pronounced as "teng"? When does that happen...and why does that happen?? Well, this video will show you! Learn how to smooth out your conversational English and connect words together using the nasal consonants M /m/, N /n/, and NG /ŋ/. And practice with me at the end!

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Apr
19
2021

The Rule of Three

Have you ever wondered why native speakers of American English don't pronounce the "t" in "lastly"? Or in "Christmas"? Or in the phrase "first day"? It's because of the Rule of Three! The Rule of Three happens to other consonants as well, and it occurs both within words and across word boundaries when linking words together. Learn all about the Rule of Three in this video, and practice with me at the end!

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Apr
05
2021

Linking with the B /b/ Consonant

If you want to master American English rhythm, you must perfect your linking skills! This video will discuss how to link words together using the B /b/ consonant, one of the stop consonants in American English. The B /b/ consonant, like other stop consonants, can be pronounced differently depending on where it occurs in the word and sentence, and depending on what sound comes after the B /b/ consonant. Sometimes the B /b/ consonant is unreleased (like in the phrase "cab driver"), and sometimes it actually moves to the next word and is released (like in "The cab is here")!

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Mar
15
2021

Linking with the P /p/ Consonant

This video will discuss how to link words together using the P /p/ consonant, one of the stop consonants in American English. The P /p/ consonant, like other stop consonants, can be pronounced differently depending on where it occurs in the word and sentence, and depending on what sound comes after the P /p/ consonant. Sometimes the P /p/ consonant is unreleased (like in "Top Gun"), and sometimes it actually moves to the next word and is released (like in "cup of coffee")! Perfect your American English linking skills in this video and practice with me at the end!

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Mar
08
2021

Linking with the K /k/ Consonant

The K /k/ consonant is a stop consonant, and even though it is called a "stop" consonant, it really should be called a "change" consonant - its pronunciation can change depending on where it occurs in the word. Sometimes it is released, sometimes it is unreleased, sometimes it is "mini-released", and sometimes it moves to the next word (!!!!!).

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Feb
15
2021

Linking with the G /g/ Consonant

What's the best way to improve the rhythm of your spoken English? Linking! Linking is how words (and syllables) connect to each other in spoken English. And once you know how to use linking effectively, your speech will sound smooth and rhythmic, with each word almost blending into the next. This video will show you how to link words together using the stop consonant G /g/, and you'll have a chance to practice with me at the end!

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Jan
11
2021

Nasal Plosion and a Final T Consonant

This video is for all the advanced English speakers out there!! Let's combine two important (and tricky) pronunciation areas of American English: The T consonant and nasal plosion!

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Dec
28
2020

The Glottal Stop in American English

Glottal Stop. Stop T. Glottal T. All three terms refer to the same sound, and this sound is very common in American English. In this video, you'll learn 4 ways to use the glottal stop in American English! Master the American accent and learn how to use the glottal stop in words like "certain", "oven", and "can't", and when linking words together, like in "let me"!

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Dec
21
2020

All About the Flap (aka Flap T)

What's the easiest way to sound more like a native speaker of American English? Use the flap! The flap occurs everywhere in American English, and if you want to sound natural to a native speaker, you must learn how to pronounce it and when to use it! Learn all about the flap in this video, both within words and when linking between words!

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Nov
30
2020

Linking with the Unreleased D

If you want to speak like a native speaker of American English, you have to master linking! Linking is how native speakers connect words together in spoken English, and there are lots of ways to do it! This video will teach you how to link words together using the D consonant, like in the sentence, "I had to." Something funny happens to the D sound - it becomes unreleased! Watch to learn more!

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Nov
02
2020

How to Link Words Using the Stop T

A funny thing happens to the True T sound when it comes at the end of a word. Sometimes it turns into a completely different sound - a Stop T sound. Native speakers may use a Stop T within a word, like in the word "written", or between words to link them together, like in the phrase "Put that down". Improve the rhythm of your spoken English and learn the rules for using a Stop T sound to link words together in this video!

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Feb
04
2020

Vowel to Vowel Linking in American English

Improve the flow of your spoken English through linking words together!

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Jan
15
2020

Linking In Connected Speech

Spoken English sounds like one, long connected word.

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